Secrets of the Supplement Industry Revealed

Nature Made Vitamins issued a

NATIONWIDE RECALL on its gummy vitamins!

Chinese herbs

They issued the recall fearing Salmonella and/or Staphylococcus Aureus contamination.

(link to press release here)

Do you know what’s really in your pills and capsules?

Find out at this FREE webinar.

“How To Choose A Quality Supplement” 
I give you the insider secrets the supplement companies will never tell you!

Nothing is taboo – fillers, testing myths –
synthetic vitamins.  I’m letting the cat out of the bag

and it’s completely FREE!

Click HERE to listen

Why You Want To Avoid Magnesium Stearate

Why You Want To Avoid Magnesium Stearate

Not all supplements are created equal!

U.S. adults surveyed in Dec. 2014 said “taking vitamins” was in their top five wellness habit plans for 2015.  Yet, many supplement have flowing agents which suppress your natural killer cells, a key component of your immune system.  As the vitamin and supplement industry grows into one of the fastest growing industries worldwide, it’s time for the big companies to come clean about the ADDITIVES in dietary supplements. (1)

Continue reading “Why You Want To Avoid Magnesium Stearate”

Can Cinnamon Help Protect You From Cancer?

University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Researchers and the UA Cancer Center say a compound found in cinnamon is a potent colorectal cancer preventor.

New research suggests eating cinnamon may help prevent colorectal cancer, at least in mice.

Previous research has linked this spice to blood pressure reduction and blood sugar control.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has used both the cinnamon tree bark and cinnamon tree branches for over a thousand years.

The bark of the tree is known as Gui Zhi and used in Chinese herbal formulations as a warming and dispersing herb. It helps protect against catching a cold and it can facilitate at warming the Qi, or energy of the body.

Researchers at Arizona College of Pharmacy found the compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive smell and flavor, cinnamaldehyde, also seems to protect rodents against colorectal cancer.

“This is a significant finding,” UA Cancer Center researcher Dr. Donna Zhang, said in a press release. “The next steps are to see if the spice alone can protect against cancer, and see if results can be replicated in people.”

“Can cinnamon do it, now that we know pure cinnamaldehyde can?” he said. “And can we use cinnamaldehyde or cinnamon as a weapon to go after other major diseases, such as inflammatory dysregulation and diabetes? “

Chinese herbs like cinnamon have always been used in TCM with other herbs in synergistic combinations. Using this Chinese herb or any others as a single herb should only be done under the care of a professional trained in Chinese medicine or herbal medicine.  In TCM, Chinese herbs are most often combined to enhance or create an entourage effect for the desired action and to minimize any potential side effects.  Should you have any questions about cinnamon or other Chinese herbs,   get in touch with Cathy at Pacific Herbs for a free consultation at 877-818-9990.

Preventing Breast Cancer Is Possible

Breast Cancer AwarenessBreast cancer awareness means different things to different people.  For the month of October, you can’t even turn on a football game without seeing a goal post wrapped in hot pink or football players wearing pink socks.

But let’s get real.  Breast cancer, like all cancers are better prevented than cured.  I think we can all agree we would rather NOT get cancer during our life time.  But the reality is, many don’t feel we have a say in the ‘Dis-Ease’ process.

We get handed illness – we don’t choose illness.

Can we hand ourselves HEALTH?   I believe we can!

Prevention is the cure!  Everyday, we can give ourselves health.  In the foods we eat, the thoughts we focus on and the life we create.

Regarding specifically ‘Breast Cancer’ check out one way to focus on health Continue reading “Preventing Breast Cancer Is Possible”

Are Herb Supplements Still Bio-Active If They Have Fillers?

Most plants and herbs are naturally “Bio-Active” meaning they are digestible by humans and our gut (our large and small intestines). Recognizing the chemicals nutrients from plants is not as easy for your body today because often we eat and swallow herbal supplements with tons of “non-bio-active” fillers.

Just like your eyes understand these words because you have been trained in English language, your intestines can decode the language of plant chemicals that come through our guts. But when man-made chemicals arrive, i.e. fillers in herbal supplements such as magnesium stearate, a man-made chemical, then bio-activity slows to a crawl. Your body is not good a deciphering these new man-made chemicals that is has never seen before. It’s like trying to read English without ever learning the alphabet. You simply have no idea what they letters mean.

On the contrary, when herbs and plants are ingested,the curative are more powerful because all the plant chemical constituents become more BIO-AVAILABLE to our human genome. Our bodies, for thousands of years have ingested these chemicals and our bodies can decipher plant chemical make-up.

How do we know this? The research is overwhelming. Chemical pictures via computer programs using high performance liquid chromotography reveal marker chemicals in various herbs. These chemicals, for example, astraglaside #4 in Astragalus (huang qi) is higher in concentration in after boiling astragalus (huang qi) in a pot of hot water for 30 minutes than when testing the raw root material.

If we take it a step further and we cook the herbs in hot water boiling process and start to break down the fibrous plant material the plants will release even more chemical constituents with curative powers. The ancient Chinese knew this and therefore always boiled their herbs and drank the water as a tea, rather than eating the roots or leaves raw.

This tradition survives today. Boil your herbs and enjoy freshly released bio-active compounds and bio-availability of a matrix of healing herbal compounds. If you don’t have time to boil your own, Pacific Herbs line of herbs in granules have already been cooked and concentrated and have all the bio-active compounds you need to stay healthy. Check out the easiest way to get Bio-Active herbs here.

No Pink Pill Needed: The Original Viagra is Horny Goat Weed A Famous Chinese Herb

Couple on beach

Are you searching for a natural Viagra?  

The Chinese herb known as Epimedium has been used to boost libido and increase sexual desire and performance for generations.  

Now that the “Pink Pill” was just approved women have their own viagra with a long list of side-effects. Using an natural alternative like Libido Boost Herb Pack for Him and Her is both effective,  safe and without side-effects.  For many this is a dream come true.

Researchers at the University of Milan, Italy say Epimedium (Horny Goat Weed) has what everyone who experiences erectile dysfunction needs.  Additionally the Chinese herb, Epimedium (AKA horny goat weed) has fewer side effects than Viagra and certainly the new Pink Pill viagra for women.

This natural aphrodisiac has been used in Chinese herbal medicine for centuries and is well known for increasing blood flow and freeing up bound testosterone.  This promote natural erections and sex drive.  It has been confirmed by these Italian researchers that icariin, a compound found in horny goat weed has the same effect as sildenafil, the active component in Viagra.  This icariin blocks the enzyme which controls blood flow to the penis.  Once an erection is achieved the icariin helps maintain that erection by inhibiting PDE5, (phosphodiesterase-5).

 

Horny goat weed is the only Chinese herb which has demonstrated the PDE5 inhibitor effect.

If a drug was made from Horny Goat Weed it would be even more effective than Viagra.

 

However, since Horny Goat Weed is a natural plant it is not patentable. Like so many other Chinese herbs we know about there are less side effects than most prescription drugs. 

Horny goat weed is found in the wild in China, Asia and Europe and the highest quality we could find is available here.  As with all our herbal products our Chinese herb granules and thoroughly tested and standardized to 5:1 ration minimums.  This means a higher potency than most products which fail to disclose any information regarding their potency ratio’s.

 

Journal reference: Journal of Natural Products, DOI: 10.1021/np800049y

Chinese New Year Sale

Chinese herbs Happy Chinese New

Year Everybody!!

Congratulations on arriving at

the year of the Yang Horse! 

It's going to be a wild ride..

  GIDDY UP!

 

To start it off with a bang

Pacific Herbs is offering 

 

FREE SHIPPING & 10% OFF 

 

Friday Jan 31 – Sunday Feb 2, 2104 

 

Use Coupon code: 14newyear

 

Connect to our store here

 

Beginning Feb 3rd we will have some modest price

increases due to raw material cost and production costs.

-small thin wide banner ad-energy

 
 

P.S.  If you heard about Corydalis on Dr. Oz, YES we have it and Corydalis

is also in our PMS Relief Herb Pack. 

————————————————————————————————————-

Sorry about any duplicates.  To remove yourself from our list please use this link:

 

 

 

Boost Your Immune System With A Pet

Not that we needed another great reason to get a pet, but this reason rocks! Now we have research that shows dogs and cats help build healthy bacteria in your gut which builds a healthy immune system and protects you from allergies. Wow, go adopt a pet now if you don’t already have at least one.

 

The latest research shows how it works. Turns out it all starts in your gut, also know as our digestive system. No surprise, the gut has been labeled in recent years your second brain and the hub of your immune system.

 

In a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, mice exposed to dust from homes with dogs were protected against allergens known to trigger asthma. This dog-associated dust enriches the variety of gut bacteria in the mice with Lactobacillus johnsonii, a type of bacteria that protects the airway against allergens and infection by beefing up mucous membrane immunity. Cats have been found helpful too. The earlier in life your body is exposed the stronger your immune system becomes.

 

“In our previous research, we demonstrated that homes with indoor/outdoor cats also exhibited a more diverse house dust microbiome,” says study author Susan Lynch, PhD, associate professor of medicine at the University of California in San Francisco.

 

Many folks find it difficult or stressful to own a pet.  A natural solution to keeping pets calm and stress free is a new product from Pacific Herbs called Natural Pet Calm Herb Pack and can be found online at www.PacHerbs.com.

 

Reference: KE Fujimura et al. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1310750111 (2013).

11 Easy Ways To Eat and Lose Weight Naturally Following The Asian Diet Plan

The focus of Asian diet plan is to create wellness. By practicing these dietary habits you will  have health and energy for life.

 We all know:  “Health is not simply the absence of sickness.” — Hannah Green

Consider ways to eat what you enjoy and enjoy what you eat by following these Asian Diet secrets.

This list has been perfected and practiced for centuries.

To paraphrase Sun Simiao, the great Chinese physician in the sixth century, one wastes the skill of a great physician if one does not first consider the food he or she are eating. This is still true today. Consider also when you eat and how you eat as you read the tips below.

11 Asian Diet Habits

#1. Limit Drinks, Especially Cold Drinks With Meals

Americans have a bad habit of drinking a cold glass of water or soda with meals. Changing this habit alone will create better digestion of food. Limit fluid intake with your meals and you will stop diluting your digestive enzymes which are so important for proper digestion. Green tea or other hot teas before a meal supports enzymatic activity and helps enhance your digestive abilities. It’s best to add liquids 30 minutes before or after meals, not during.

#2.  Enjoy Soup Often

Soup is a nutrient dense food and fills you up quickly. You don’t need much, just a half cup is beneficial. Most Asian soups are made with bones and/or combinations of vegetables so you’re getting lots of vitamins and minerals even with a small portion. Whether it is bone broth soup, vegetable or miso, soups are rich in vitamins and minerals and easily absorbed. Secondly, but equally important is that the warm temperature of soup (like tea) can improve the entire digestive process.

#3. Eat a 3:1 Ratio Vegetables to Meat

3:1 means three times the amount of vegetables to the amount of meat. The meat and potato American diet does not make much room for vegetables on the plate. In fact, the favorite American vegetable, potatoes, (i.e., French fries) should be replaced with sweet potatoes if you absolutely can’t live without that starch. Better still, consider vegetables with bitter flavors. Give radishes, radicchio and bitter melon a spot on your plate.

#4. Small Plates and Chopsticks

Small serving bowls and small plates are a great way to eat smaller portions. I love to mix up attractive small plates and bowls in different shapes and sizes. Not only is it aesthetically pleasing to eat from these but it helps you eat smaller portions. Chopsticks are another easy way to avoid the shovel techniques of eating. For the average American inexperienced chopstick user, they are guaranteed to slow down your rate of consumption and give your stomach time to send the message to your brain that you’re full and it’s time to stop eating.

#5. Rice Combining

Rice combinations like black, brown, red, or even purple rice are nutritionally denser than white or brown alone. (The best is unpolished/less processed rice, because it is rich in B vitamins.) Rice is eaten to supplement the meal in Asia, not a main course. Rice has always been a popular carbohydrate, cheap to grow and easy to transport and store. But as a carbohydrate it is converted into sugar during the digestive process. This means it can cause a dramatic effect in our glycemic index. This is good for fast energy, but bad if you want to avoid blood sugar fluctuations and bad for those who are diabetic or pre-diabetic. Rice combinations are less starchy therefore less sugar conversion and lower in calories.

#6. Not Every Night Is Dessert Night

My kids will tell you from the time they were very little if they asked about dessert, my standard answer was “tonight is not dessert night.” Admittedly, this didn’t work so well past the age of 7, but it’s still a great rule of thumb. If you must have dessert make it fruit. Fruit is nutritious and delicious and a common Asian dessert. Cut and serve it up in a fun and interesting way to make it that much more exciting. Sugary cakes, cookies and ice cream can be for special celebrations only.

#7. Seafood — See Food Differently

No need to repeat what we already know. Research supports this common Asian diet practice of eating fish daily. We’ve heard all about the healthy oils from fish. Fish has always been part of man’s diet nearly everywhere in the world, not just Asia. But the Asian culture has kept this part of their heritage alive better than most.

#8. Asian Snacks are Healthier

Take a look at what Asians eat for snacks and compare it with the American chips and cookies and you’ll understand part of the reason Americans are so overweight and Asians are not. Choose seaweed snacks, nuts, dried fruit and seeds. I love pumpkin and sunflower seeds. All are easy to find in nearly every market. These healthy snacks are packed full of micro-nutrients, vitamins and minerals and the choices are limitless. One caveat, do watch out for the salt content of nuts. Raw is preferred but admittedly not as tasty as salted. If you really want the salt, try “lightly salted” versions.

#9. Optimize Food Temperatures With Seasons

Energetic temperatures of foods should not be overlooked. Eat warming foods in cold weather and cooling foods in hot weather. This common-sense rule of thumb is barely spoken in Asia because it’s simply practiced. Cold drinks and cold foods such celery, melons and cold salads are not eaten in the middle of winter. Hot soups and stews with meat are preferred because this is what the body needs in cold weather. A hot summer day is the perfect time for watermelon or a cooling drink made with aloe and cucumber. Every food has an energetic temperature and acts on the body accordingly. Eating the right temperature foods during the various season of the year is an important part of a healthy diet.

#10. Avoid Cow’s Milk and Milk Combining

Milk combines horribly with just about everything, while supplying vastly too much calcium and not enough magnesium. Cow’s milk is completely absent in Asian diets. Other cultures such as Jewish kosher rules recognized thousands of years ago that milk products should be eaten apart from other foods. If you just can’t give up cow’s milk, at the very least don’t ignore the tenet of food combining. Combining the wrong foods, i.e., dairy, slows down gut motility to a snail’s pace, the exact opposite of what is best for healthy digestion. Replacements for cow’s milk are easier than ever today with the arrival of convenient cartons of almond, coconut, rice or organic soy milk.

#11 is regular bowel movements.

Healthy eating and good digestion create healthy bowel movements and a healthy gut is a clean gut. Although often not talked about in the S.A.D. Standard American Diet, a minimum of one bowel movement a day is an absolute necessity. So much of our immune system is dependent on our gut health and this is one reason proper digestion is key to optimizing our health and wellness. This is our body’s natural detox method and the last on this list of Asian diet tips.  Check out  Skinny Boost Herb Pack a Chinese herb formula for improving bowel health is the  #1 formula used in Japan to improve weight loss results and detox the gut gently and safely.

 

Chinese Herbs Safety Information

chinese herbs safetyMany people today turn to alternative medicine to deal with an array of health issues, including trouble with sleep, menopause, pms, lack of energy, weight loss…the list goes on.

It is extremely important then that we know what we are putting in our bodies. All foods, including herbs have the potential to be dangerous if grown with heavy pesticide use. Pacific Herbs has been aware of this from the birth of our company…. and that's why we use the gold standard of testing to ensure the quality and safety of our herbs.

Watch this short video explaining how you can learn if your herbs are safe.

 

Ever Wonder Where Your Herbal Supplements Come From ?

Safe Chinese herbal supplements Have you ever you wondered where your herbal supplements really come from?  Did you know that 95% of what you're buying at U.S. health food stores originated in China or was processed in China or India?  

Below is a section of one of the many emails I get nearly daily from companies who want to sell me their ingredients.  As you can see much of it is written in Mandarin and there is no mistake the company selling these ingredients is based in China.  When I inquired with them about testing of their products they, like so many companies have DO no testing on their raw materials or finished products.   I said, "WHAT, NO TESTING?"   Yup, that's right.  No tests!  That means if the farment used pesticides you will get pesticides in your herbal supplements.  

 If you are concerned your supplements may contain heavy metal, pesticides, bacteria, E-Coli, and other contaminents you are right.  They probably do!  Get your products from a trusted source.  Only buy from companies that produce COA's (Certificates of Analysis) and have lot numbers and expiration dates on their products.  This is the only way to know you're not getting cheap ingredients produced at the cheapest prices without testing and without assurance that your herbal supplements and vitamins are truly safe. 

More on COA's here!

P.S.  All Pacific Herbs products are produced with COA's, Lot numbers and have over 200 purity and potency tests before they are packaged into finished products. 


Dear Madam,

This is our company's hot-selling products recently Vitamin C- Ascorbic acid (from Tapioca Grade / Cassava) (corn), soy and green tea.  We have best price and most favorable terms. Please contact me at numbers below. We ship directly.

Serial     number    Name      Active principle

01         大豆提取物(Soybean P.E.)  大豆异黄酮(Soy Isoflavones)

02        山楂叶提取物(Hawthorn Leaf Extract) 山楂叶黄酮(Hawthorn Leaf Flavones)熊果酸(Ursolic acid)

03       绿茶提取物(Green Tea P.E.)   茶多酚(Tea Polyphenols)儿茶素(Catechins )咖啡因(Caffeine )

04     黑升麻提取物(Black Cohosh P.E.)三萜皂甙(Triterpene Glycosides)

05     槐米提取物(Pagodatree Flower Bud Extract )卢丁(Rutin)

06     葡萄籽提取物(Grape Seed P.E) 原花青素(Proanthocyanidins)

Look forward to your reply.

John  

Sales Manager

(Company information deleted to for my protection)

Chinese Herbs From A Western Medicine Viewpoint

How a Harvard-trained doctor began to appreciate Traditional Chinese Medicine, TCM.

As a child growing up in China, I was always aware of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). TCM is what we refer to as Eastern medicine, in contrast to the Western medicine we know from U.S. hospitals. I never understood much about TCM, only that it somehow involves herbs and that many Chinese people used it. The more I progressed in my medical training in major U.S. academic centers, the more distanced I felt from TCM. Why should I learn about something that lacks evidence, when there’s so much to know about for which there is good research?

 

Last fall, I went to China on a research trip. While my study is primarily on its Western medical system, I was so fascinated by what I learned of Eastern medicine that I spent many free evenings observing TCM practitioners. There is so much I didn’t know. As a discipline, TCM is far too complex for me to understand in my short observation, but there are some very important “lessons from the East” that are applicable to our Western medical practice:

 

#1. Listen—really listen. The first TCM practitioner I shadowed explained to me that to practice TCM is to “listen with your whole body”. Pay attention and use every sense you have, he said. I watched this doctor as he diagnosed a woman with new-onset cervical cancer and severe anemia the moment she walked into his exam room, and within two minutes, without blood tests or CTs, sent her to be admitted to a (Western) medical service. I’ve seen expert clinicians make remarkable diagnoses, but this was something else!

“How could you know what you had and that she needed to be admitted?” I asked.

“I smelled the cervical cancer,” he said. “I looked and saw the anemia. I heard her speak and I knew she could not care for herself at home.” (I followed her records in the hospital; he was right on all accounts.)

 

#2. Focus on the  diagnosis. I watched another TCM doctor patiently explain to a young woman with long-standing abdominal pain why painkillers were not the answer.

“Why should we treat you for something if we don’t know what it is?” he said. “Let’s find out the diagnosis first.” What an important lesson for us—to always begin the diagnosis.

 

#3. Treat the whole person. “A big difference between our two practices,” said one TCM doctor, “Is that Western medicine treats people as organs. Eastern medicine treats people as a whole.” Indeed, I watched her inquire about family, diet, and life stressors. She counseled on issues of family planning, food safety, and managing debt. She even helped patients who needed advice on caring for the their elderly parents and choosing schools for their child. This is truly “whole person” care!

 

#4. Health is not just about disease, but also about wellness. There is a term in Chinese that does not have its exact equivalent in English. The closest translation is probably “tune-up to remain in balance”, but it doesn’t do the term justice, because it refers to maintaining and promoting wellness. Many choose to see a TCM doctor not because they are ill, but because they want to be well. They believe TCM helps them keep in balance. It’s an important lesson for doctors and patients alike to address wellness and prevention.

 

#5. Medicine is a life-long practice. Western medicine reveres the newest as the best; in contrast, patients revere old TCM doctors for their knowledge and experience. Practicing doctors do not rest on their laurels.

“This is a practice that has taken thousands of years to develop,” I was told. “That’s why you must keep learning throughout your life, and even then you will only learn just a small fraction.” Western medicine should be no different: not only are there new medical advances all the time, doctors need to continually improve their skills in the art of medicine.

 

#6. Evidence is in the eyes of the beholder. Evidence-based medicine was my mantra in Western medical training, so I was highly skeptical of the anecdotes I heard. But then I met so many patients who said that they were able to get relief from Eastern remedies while Western treatments failed them. Could there be a placebo effect? Sure. Is research important? Of course. But research is done on populations, and our treatment is of individuals. It has taken me a while to accept that I may not always be able to explain why—but that the care should be for the individual patient, not a population of patients.

“In a way, there is more evidence for our type of medicine than for yours,” a TCM teacher told me. “We have four thousand years of experience—that must count for something!”

 

There is so much I have not covered about TCM. Its practices vary regionally, and no doubt, there are more and less capable practitioners (as there are in Western medicine). More research into TCM methods will be important. However, regardless of whether we Western doctors want to prescribe TCM treatments, we should recognize there is much to learn from Eastern medicine, including what it means to be a physician to really care for our patients. Upon my return from China, I, for one, have a new found appreciation for Eastern medical practice and a renewed understanding of holistic medical care.